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In Loving Memory...
~ Gogo Fatale ~


6/2/01 - 10/11/11
~ Forever the Marest of Them All ~
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Thursday, October 27, 2011

Pieces of Heart Horses.

This story begins with a younger me, my beloved gelding Metro, and a laptop in a college dorm room. I was a freshman, completely enamored with my beast-gelding, and was spending a moment of my free time surfing the vast interwebz for old information about my horse instead of doing something important (homework? Why do that?). Quite by accident, I stumbled upon a sale ad for a bay mare named Chloe in Alberta, Canada. Her sire was listed as Blue Rodeo, Metro's Canadian-registered name. Immediately I perked up. He was her sire? I knew he had been kept a stallion until he was six, and that he had bred a few mares, but didn't know of any actual offspring around anywhere. Sure enough, the fantastic little mare was up for grabs at a fairly hefty price. Video clips of her showed some dressage and galloping cross country. Pictures told of a beautiful, well put together mare. Her description sounded like she was exactly like my Metro, even walking boldly up to a running chainsaw and attempting to put her nose on it (yikes!). I oogled over the ad for weeks, wishing I could somehow find a way to afford a second horse. One day, a big graphic proclaiming "SOLD!" appeared on the front of her ad. Disappointed but not discouraged, I e-mailed the owners and asked if I could be put in touch with her new owner so I could speak with her. After some complicated finagling, and some months down the road, I managed to reach her. We sent countless e-mailed to each other, chronicling our collective related journeys and our precious horses. I was enamored with the little mare.

A year or so down the road, I got back in touch with the mare's owner. We discussed setting up a custom breeding for me for a Windfall baby out of her, now redubbed from Chloe to Sophie. My Metro had died by this time, and I wanted to keep a piece of him alive with me always. This never ended up coming to fruition, as I ended up buying Gogo instead. I told the owner that if she ever needed to find a home for Sophie, she could always contact me and I'd take her in a heartbeat.

We kept in touch over the following few years, just little drop ins to ask how everything was going and how our little mares were doing. Sophie was bred and produced a precious little filly by a Swedish stud, born right in the middle of a horrible storm with no muss or fuss. Life went on as it always had.

A year and a half ago, I couldn't get ahold of the owner. Her e-mail had been changed, and I had to do some serious Googling to find her. It took some time, but I managed to get ahold of her again to see how Sophie was doing. Much to my surprise, she was for sale. The owner was pregnant and no longer had time for her. Would I like to buy her for $10,000? Well, I couldn't exactly afford that random expense, much less keep two horses at the level which I was accustomed (spoiling rotten and sparing no expense), so I unfortunately had to turn her down. I was heartbroken. I wanted that mare so badly it made me ache.

She offered her to me again some months down the road. Again, I couldn't afford to keep two horses, so I declined. I forgot about it in the haze of rehabbing Gogo. We lost touch again.


This morning, completely out of the blue, I received another e-mail from the owner. I hadn't spoken to her in nearly a year. Would I still be interested in Sophie, she asked? Price dropped to $2500.



Good lord. Could that timing be better? One door closes, another opens.



This isn't the perfect deal. She's 15. She had an old stifle injury years ago that I know nothing about. I have no idea what she's been up to, if anything. I have to hear back from the owner concerning all of these things. But honestly, with this horse I wouldn't even care if she was just another expensive hayburner looking pretty out in a field. Let's hope she's not, let's hope she's perfectly rideable and wonderful, but either way it wouldn't matter to me. I've been actively pursuing this horse for almost 7 years. She could have three legs in the grave for all I care.



It's interesting about how much resistance I've gotten about this. Everyone says not to even bother thinking about pursuing it. Everyone is absolutely sure that they know what I want. Even my own mother told me I wanted a different kind of horse than this. I think that is all very interesting, seeing as aside from owning a piece of my heart horse, I don't even know what I want. To be fair, externally I imagine it looks like I want another uber-talented youngster who can replace Gogo as a Prelim prospect. In reality, the more that I think about it, the more that I feel ill about the prospect of essentially breaking and killing another horse. Do I want a horse with huge expectations and then be horribly let down when I fail to take them anywhere except to Lameness Town, or do I want something sweet and fun that will pleasantly surprise me if they turn out to be a good riding horse? Do I actually want to look at all of the following: a big, fancy warmblood that will win everything but totally fall apart a few years down the road? A little project mutt that will be fun but might not amount of anything at all? An off the track broken down maniac that might either kill me or itself in the process of turning it around? When you put it all that way, it's hard not to get discouraged about this whole process, and I'm pretty soured off the whole sporthorse ordeal at the moment.



This is not a good picture of her - Blogger for whatever reason won't let me upload the good ones - but you can get a vague idea of what she sort of looks like:



She's a lovely lovely girl.

59 comments:

Gal Wednesday said...

Haters gonna hate, I say go for it! If she gets there and is good for a twice a week hack and some loving, will you be any less happy with her?? Doesn't sound like it.
Fortune favours the bold. Carpe Diem!

tangerine said...

Sounds like you were meant to be together. You know what feels right - just go with your gut. You're too damn smart to let other people tell you what's right and wrong :D

Ashleigh said...

I totally and completely understand your desire to get her. It just...matters when it's something revolving around those "special horses". If I ever found a relative of Pirates, no matter what, I'd be on that horse in a HEARTBEAT. If it matters that much to you, get her. It's just...special.

Margaret said...

Hmm. I know of a woman at our barn who never rides her horse. Lots of ground work, brushing, walking the trails by his side... She is in love with her horse.

I guess the question is... what do you want/need? Could you afford two if the prices were low enough? That little mustang was sweet and this one is nice looking to. 15 isn't old if she is healthy... Can she be breed again?

Have FUN looking and let your heart talk, but don't let it rule your head. Know what you are getting into... and get her vet checked! But I'm sure you know that already.

Diligent Horse said...

Andrea,

I saw your FB post today and saw the immediate negative response you had gotten on there regarding "Sophie." But let that not discourage you. I think you have followers who care about you, as they've watched you through the up's and down's with GoGo, read stories about Metro and want you to make the right choice. Sometimes it may appear out of left field and other times it may appear very logical.
Either way, it's your choice.
I have to say that whatever you choose, no matter what, "bad" horse or not in the end, it's always a journey, even the low parts teach us incredible lessons and allow us to look at life a little differently, possibly even softer, more aware. Each horse is a gift in it's own right, despite what it does or does not do for what we want. Do whatever feels right!

TBA said...

That is so perfect! I can definitely understand why you would want her. If I ever found one of my mare Jazzy's babies or full siblings I would seriously consider buying them! Fingers crossed that she's sound and rideable!

Shannon said...

Well, maybe I'm not the best one to offer advice.... I ended up with the filly who shares the same sire (gosh, half sibling is so much easier to say) as my boys after a similar journey. I bought her sight unseen after going back and forth (from ten months to age three) with her owner. Somehow the planets finally aligned to bring us together....and that was a lot of aligning, because I really wasn't looking for another horse. I believe in all things happening for a reason, and you know what will make you happiest.
She's certainly your type, and lovely to boot.

Net said...

Sounds like she's meant to be there with you. Seriously, follow your heart - and at least based on your post, it seems your heart is pretty clear about where it wants to be. Who gives a rat's a$$ what anyone else thinks? You are responsible for your own happiness, not mine or anyone else's.

(And if my gelding had sired any babies, I would want them. I get it in a wistful "I wish he had babies" way.)

Jess said...

I bought a 15-year-old mare with a stifle injury. We had seven wonderful years together.

If it feels right, do it.

DressageIsToDance said...

Well, on the Sophie issue, I hesitate to give an opinion, because it really depends on how much her relationship to Metro means to you and how much you'd be willing to sacrifice to have her because of that. It's something only you can decide.

As far as the WB, TB or a mutt goes. Well, WBs and TBs can be great and talented - they can be super sound for life or fall apart. And you have good reason to feel burnt out on the sporthorse front.

Mutts can definitely be a gamble, but they can also have amazing potential if they are put together right and have a good work ethic and disposition. The pony I leased before I bought Amber was a 14hh mutt and he kicked ASS at dressage. Before I stopped leasing him, he was working on the beginnings of a walk pirouette.

But you could always try a nice QH or an Appendix. ;) Not biased...or anything...

QHs for the most part are pretty hardy. And there is such a variety of types, you could easily find something that could be really competitive - especially if it were an Appendix. I love my QH. And you like compact horses - most QHs tend to be pretty compact.

Sterling Bishir said...

I saw on Facebook how much people were opposing this. Personally, I was quite annoyed. If it was me, I'd get her. So many people mentioned the longevity of these warmbloods, which in all reality has nothing to do with it. You may have happened to have warmbloods that broke down, but how many warmbloods are out there that never have a problem? If you feel drawn to this horse, who is absolutely beautiful by the way, buy her. People shouldn't be able to tell you what to do.

Breathe said...

She's the best horse ever. Go get her.

Denali's Mom said...

Follow your heart. I believe things happen for a reason.

Deered said...

Are you prepared to only do what she is capable of until you are in a position to have an additonal horse?
Are you going to get bored if you can only hack out on her?
So you think it could be a good break for you to not be trying to bring on a competition prospect?
Hell if such a thing existed in the US (or they were cheaper) I'd say get a Stationbred - I'm sure you saw/heard about then in NZ - many of them seem to be indestructable, and on the most part they have good brains, but they're not in the US, and I' not sure that they would handle the stalling/lack of normal horse life that (from reading a few blogs) seems to be the normal, or best level of care in the US.

Lisa said...

This is your next horse. Go get her. $2,500 is a STEAL!

Mrs. Exeter said...

The universe wants you to have this horse! xxx

Tricia said...

I've never been a real "Lord works in mysterious ways" kind of girl, but I think in horses, you do have to sort of let the cosmos work its wonders through you.

This entire equine gig is so utterly and ridiculously impractical that it is about nothing but intuition and the pull of the heart on the tides of the soul. Only you know when the surf is up and its time to ride that perfect wave, no matter how you define it.

Good luck, Andrea. Follow your instincts!

Andrea said...

Deered, if I had this horse and could only look at her in a field and groom her every day, that would be fine with me. That isn't what I want in a regular old horse, to be sure, but this mare is a different story.

(I did just get an update from the rider though, she's sound and doing fine.)

Barbara said...

She has been on your mind for years. How could you not get her now?

SmartAlex said...

Metro is sending her to help you heal. What are you waiting for?

Christine said...

DO IT! About 2 years ago I was contacted that Oliver needed a new home and if I wanted him I could have him. I was going through lameness issues with Bingo and was in college and the thought of another horse was scary, but I had to have him. She didn't do much with him and I didn't know what I was getting myself into with his old leg injury and everything, but I'm so glad I made the leap and got him. I had one fun eventing season before retiring him due to nevicular issues, and now he is happy, fat, and retired in a field. It felt like the thing for me to do, and if I had let it pass by I know that I would have regretted it forever. So if it feels like the right thing to do and you want to do it, then do it! :)

BeBe said...

At the very least go check her out!!

When I wanted Archie, people thought I was crazy, he was unrideable, couldnt leave the property and I had never even ridden him. I only saw him ONCE and I knew I was in love.

Follow your heart and instinct.

Jennifer said...

Andrea, I really do believe that things happen for a reason. It's not just coincidence that you heard from Sophie's owner now. You have not been able to get this horse out of your mind for years. Go for it. Especially since it sounds like shes still ridable. We have a little arab mare with an old stifle injury, we still ride her, she jumps like 2'6", and teaches the kids to deal with attitude. Don't let people discourage you. So what if she's 15? I'm eventing a 22 year old TB. She could still have a lot of good years.

Good luck! I hope she works out for you. Have Metro's daughter could be just the thing to help you heal. I'll be sending good thoughts that it works out for you.

Emily M. said...

I bet she's rideable, she's way past having any worth as a broodmare. So if they want $2500 for her she must be fine for wtc and other fun things.

Amy said...

I just posted about this very thing. Here is the link to the post http://slowandsteadysmilerwinstherace.blogspot.com/2011/10/steady-says-3-ft-psssh.html

But if you don't want to read through the whole thing here is the last paragraph. From it I think you will know my answer.

So to those out searching for that perfect athletic specimen I am not advocating throwing your list of pre-requisites out the window. I am merely suggesting that sometimes going with your heart/gut might trump the list.

Good luck! I also was wondering if you could email me a favorite photo you have of Gogo. I have a friend who is AMAZING at drawing horses and I wanted to have her draw your Gogo for you. I will private email my address to you.

Minus Pride said...

She's awesome and it seems meant to be. Bring her home!!!

Dressager said...

I would follow your heart. If you don't want her to compete and just to be a best friend and a piece of Metro, and frankly you have consistently wanted her for 7 years, then absolutely go for it. It sounds to me like an absolute blessing. I got teary-eyed just reading it!

Niamh said...

It all seems very serendipitous. I say go check her out and see what your gut says. She's certainly nice looking, and at that price you could likely afford a young prospect to have around while you have something to ride and maybe even compete on. Metro is taking care of you!

smazourek said...

Go get her, the universe obviously wants you to have her. Even if you can't ride her she's not a maiden mare at 15 so you could try to breed her if you wanted to.

Plus, there's something to be said for having that special horse out in the pasture, even if all you can do is groom her and take her for walks.

Laura Crum said...

I bought two older geldings four years ago for my son and myself--they have given us so much joy and are still sound riding horses today at 23 and somewhere between 15 and 20, respectively. My age and goals are very different from yours, but the pure joy and relaxation that one can have with these sweet older horses is such a pleasure. And the way I bought my son's horse is very like you describe--I kept track of him for years and when I could finally buy him, I bought him, despite the fact he was 19. And it has worked out so well. i hope you have an equally happy path with this mare.

Brittany said...

If you don't get her will you regret it? I think if you pass this up after wanting her for 7 years, you might have some regrets later.

I would love to see some more pictures of her. She looks lovely!

Nicku said...

Conflicted on this one...just dont want to see you hurting again...but realize something bad could happen with any horse whether theyre 15 months or 15 years as we've all experienced. My SF mare was a heart horse, I know exactly the feeling. I had her for only 6 months before she broke down and I had to give her away, but I loved her so much. It's one of those things you just have to do I think if the stars keep aligning the way they have so far. I've had a couple heart horses, the kind that just tug at you...some of them you get to own, some get away and you think about them forever :)

Jana said...

Holy crap! What a great story! Get thee to that mare! :)

thistimedressage said...

I'm NOT trying to be a hater...I just know how vulnerable I was right after my horse's death, and how I was nearly swayed into getting an older horse that wouldn't have been right for me.

Young, sound, athletic horses who won't break down are out there, for as cheap as this mare. The horse at my blog was exactly her price as a 3 year old. Check him out--he's a quality sport horse. half-Welsh, with that pony toughness. He can move, jump, and is all around fun. And, a lovely canter to boot.

You have such a great eye that I know you could find a similar bargain.

On the other hand, despite my comments on your FB page, I do understand the lure of a heart horse. And there is something to be said for giving a middle aged horse a new chapter. A lot of 15 year old mares are relegated to baby-making...it would be great to give her a career.

Yankecwgrl said...

Wow, what a NEAT story!

Isn't it funny how things just workout sometimes?

Good luck! Can't wait to hear how this works out!

davsgirl said...

While I do see the other side of the people who posted here & on your FB thread, if for any reason a son/daughter or sister/brother of the appy in my pic came across my way, I would not at all hesitate. He was my heart horse, my love & I lost him this past spring. If I could have him back even just to sit in the pasture & never be ridden, it would be worth it - and I can only afford one horse as well.
I think it's absolutely fate, and I think you've been trying for her for so long that if you pass her up it will eat at you for a long while.

I say go for it! :)

Margaret said...

I really liked that little mustang, but you know what makes your heart tick. If you don't have a specific agenda and you just want to be happy and do what is right for this horse... then it sounds like you have some marching orders. And you already KNOW what might happen with her and you will be a bit more prepared. It sounds like Gogo's misfortune was a total surprise and unexpected. I also think, many of these older mares and eventing horses have a lot to still give... they just can't be used for showing. And if you are OK with that, then what is keeping you? Check her out for sure. And horses, for me at least, is about love of being with them.. not just showing... It's so much more than that... or at least I think it should be. But I think you know that.

thistimedressage said...

Again, just looking out for you and speaking from experience...

It might be a good idea to wait a bit before jumping back into horse ownership. I owned a horse for 15 years and when he died, I wanted a new horse and a new chapter to help me move on. But I waited almost two years, gathering up the resources (both financially and emotionally) before buying my young guy. I felt really ready by then, and was past the pain enough to make a good choice with my second horse.

I'm just giving my experience Ymmv. I just know that those first weeks after a horse's death are a time of emotional tumult...and maybe not the best time to make a big life decision.

But, on the other hand, that's just me and my life. This may be the best thing for you and the mare...

Snowhawk Przhevalsky said...

I didn't comment on FB, as I wanted to think about what to say...

While I -really- liked the little mustang, if this mare has been on your mind for all this time, I'd say certainly consider her. Just also consider what you could and couldn't do, at least until you're stable enough to get a second, younger horse.

Still looking forward to whatever new adventures you have! :3

Netherfieldmom said...

Don't have regrets...but don't expect her to do prelim. :)

Michaela said...

$2500?! That would be a good price for a mare that nice even if she was sound only for a broodmare. I say go for it. It seems too much like fate that she is suddenly in your grasp when you are horse-shopping again. Don't let anyone tell you what to do. Go with your heart.

Sarah said...

Reading this post made me smile and brought a tear to my eye. I can imagine how you felt about Metro, and having such a history of wanting to connect with this mare, his daughter.....well, for me, there would be no question! I would love to see you buy her....only you will have that "Metro" connection to her...and that's something special.

Stacey said...

I'm not trying to be a hater, I think I was the fourth person to respond to the FB post saying "think about what you were saying about longevity in these horses." If you wouldn't have said you were so excited at the thoughts of schooling xc again, actively competing, etc...I wouldn't have said that. I mean even your other half commented in the negative toward it and he sees you everyday, he knows you better than all of us on the internet! Not saying you should listen to him though :)
In this post you said "Do I want a horse with huge expectations and then be horribly let down when I fail to take them anywhere except to Lameness Town." That sounds like you're already admitting defeat and that you have no hope of keeping a horse sound. You know that's not the case.
Sounds like your mind is made up! Go get her! Enjoy her for whatever you do or don't want to do with her! I understand the if she could only be a pasture ornament I'd still be happy with her thinking. I know if Klein ever became unrideable I would make her the world's happiest, most comfortable pasture ornament too. I wouldn't sell her if the world was ending.
How far is she from you?? You can always still breed her for the Windfoal you had planned on too at some point :)

Alana said...

Go for it. If I found out one of my deceased geldings had a bebe, I would jump all over it. You have been watching this mare for years. If you want an event horse, she is a proven broodmare. This is a perfect opportunity, at a perfect time.
And, well...in the pic she reminds me of Gogo.
Go for it, I don't think you will regret it.

Bif said...

The picture you do have makes her look lovely. And Charisma's second Olympics tell you 15 isn't always "that" old =)

If it were me, I would meet the mare and make sure I do like her as well in person and as her own self, not just as the daughter of a beloved horse. As I'm sure you already know, if you don't mesh and and she doesn't work out, it may be difficult to rehome a 15 year old (with maybe a stifle problem).

If you can "reasonably easily" afford to keep her, then I think she is definitely worth looking at. But she could end up being a choice made by emotion that leaves you grounded for the next fifteen years if your income bracket doesn't really change. You would start to resent her, I would think.

If watching the events makes you still ache to go out there with your whole heart, I say have this girl vetted and if she'll be suitable, go with her. If not, look into a horse that is at least part native bred (welsh or connemara or mustang, etc) with good bone, sound performance horses in the immediate lineage, that wasn't started until saddle until 3 or later (and hopefully not jumped until 4 or 5) and under 16 hands and hope for the best. Oh, and some sort of voodoo dancing may help, too. sigh

Horses make our hearts and break our hearts.

Margaret said...

I've been following this! I think Bif's advice is spot on.

samihob said...

Hi from Haynet - your blog has been voted BLOG OF THE DAY today - come and have a look: http://hay-net.co.uk/member/haynetadmin/blog/628/blog-of-the-day---eventing-a-gogo Well done!

Andrea said...

Much in the way that I could never resent Gogo for not being able to show, I could never resent this mare for purchasing her 'as is'.

And Stacey, I am already admitting defeat because I had a totally crippled gelding and I decided to go for the absolute best chance at soundness that I could find in the horse following him so I could never cripple and kill another... a mare who wasn't started until she was almost 5, wasn't jumped with any sort of vague seriousness until she was 7, was vetted as sparkling clean as can be, and was handled to the absolute very best of my care, and I STILL crippled and killed her.... then there is no hope beyond that for me.

Margaret said...

Andrea - Do you really think YOU crippled the horse? These things happen with horses all the time and I really don't think you can blame yourself. Many sporting horses live to ripe old ages and some have bodies that wear out. It is just a reality. I also have horse at our barn who had been kicked by another and had a leg broken - after long rehabilitation, it looks like everything will be OK. A friend just had a horse with twisted gut... and had to be put down (yesterday). I can go on and on. Horses are a risky gamble as we all face injuries and accidents around the corner every day. Hose owning is not for the faint of heart, I'm afraid.

McFawn said...

I have to agree with Stacey here.

You had BAD LUCK with lameness and your previous horses--NOT YOUR FAULT and it does not mean that there are no sound sporthorses left for you in the world!!

Your bad luck was with WBs. Try a non-WB! Lots of options out there. Mustangs, drafts, Morgans, Saddlebreds, STBs, iberian, fancy QH's...and if you're willing to look at the sub 16 hand range, even more possibilities open up. My horse is an overgrown pony--plenty big at 15'1 and plenty cheap.

I just hate to see you give up on eventing/training forever because of your bad luck with these horses.

McFawn said...

Bif's advice was good. Connemaras can JUMP and are known for toughness. Def. put them on your shopping list. And Welshes rock, too.

Bif said...

"Much in the way that I could never resent Gogo for not being able to show, I could never resent this mare for purchasing her 'as is'."

Well right, hopefully not. The difference being you had fun with Gogo for several years, and only two years of non-use.

Possible fifteen + years of non-use and no riding and using lots of income can make you wish you'd bought something younger you could compete.

When I got my heart horse, Bif, I was basically saving him, as he would have no good outcome from the infection in his face (starvation or sepsis), or ended up in a can. I told myself even if he was never ridable or useful, I would be happy to just see him in the field every day.

In less than 2 years he went through over $15,000 for just vets and surgeries and trailering to them. Add in I have to board, and he needs a lot of supplements to keep him comfortable. Will I continue to provide the best care for him? Yes. Do I resent that I am unable to afford a horse I can ride? I am human. I don't have inexhaustible resources, or support of parents or spouse. Well, when I'm still paying off his things, I admit yes. It doesn't mean I don't love him and provide the best I can for him. If I made more money, that resentment wouldn't be there. But my heart lies in developing a young horse into an athletic packer that loves its job.

He may be quite comfortable for many years yet. I may not be able to get a horse I can ride for a long time. If you're forking out oodles of cash, I think most people will agree they would rather have a horse they can do something with. Or spending money for a retirement for a horse that has really given to them.

Jeni said...

The whole "one door closes, another opens" well it's real. This woman for whatever reason also wants to you have this little mare. She could have sold her to anyone - but instead is giving your the first shot.

That says a lot, and in this market she's making sure this little mare goes to someone who cares.

Margaret said...

I LOVE my half Friesian. Talk about good bone and what a sweet, sweet nature. There are so many horses out there that are healthy and looking for a forever home... and we all know some will end up in crappy places. It is easy to fall in love with a good horse.

If this mare has a touch of laminates that doesn't mean she is ruined for riding.. but maybe for competition. If it is severe, I say don't get her (unless you have oodles of money). And if you do and she has definite health issues... you should be getting he for free. (my opinion).

Melissa said...

Hm. You seem like someone who's always pushing herself to achieve the next goal - you know best if you've really got your heart set on a horse that you can push to perform or if you'll be happy with one that may not go any further than she is today. I can totally see how *not* setting any big expectations for yourself or your horse would be nice for a while!

Do be a little careful that you're not making this decision out of a bad emotional place, it's easy to make the wrong decision when emotions are running high.

But I say definitely go look at her. It's possible that you'll meet her and her personality will be totally different than what you were expecting. Get the best vet check that money can buy and a good idea of what she's going to be physically capable of.

You might keep an eye to her resale potential - if you decide you want to compete at a higher level again a few years down the road, how much of a market is there for a horse at her level? If she turns out not to be what you want after a while, she may still be exactly what someone else wants.

This is a pretty cool opportunity. Good luck!

Katie said...

I think its fate, honestly. Right time, right price. Even if all she does is restore your faith in your ability to keep a horse sound, and just tool around together for a few years at lower levels. I think she isn't coming into your life to be your serious competition horse, but that doesn't even sound like what is at the top of your list right now. And who knows, she might surprise you! So I say get her.

Kerri said...

This is going to be only vaguely helpful, if that - I'm of the camp that believes you get the horse you need, not the horse you want. The universe will put you in the right place at the right time, but you have to recognize the opportunity.

If Sophie turns out to be unfit for competition, I'm sure you'd still love her and learn a lot from her. I would compare it to owning a dog: I don't "do" anything with my dog besides take him for walks, play in the park, and snuggle up on the couch. He doesn't win me any trophies. He only costs me money and chews up my mail. But I love him just the same.

achieve1dream said...

Go for it! I'm in tears just reading this story. You already love her so much, that's totally obvious. There is a reason she's still available because she was meant for you. Keeping my fingers crossed.

SOPHIE said...

Hey, this is so completely odd. I'm not sure if you read all these, but I do hope you see this. I'm typing on my phone so forgive any weird typos.

I was sitting here on the couch here with my totally non horse best friend trying to describe the moustache my little Appy used to have. When I'd throw her hay she'd give me kisses and it used to tickle the back of my neck. Her name was Dot, and she was my best friend - I think I was the only one who could get on her without her throwing a squealy hissy fit. We had to sell her before I went to high school when my mother had to get a new job.

So, I was sitting here thinking, crying a little. All I could think about was how even now, all these years later, if somehow she came back into my life...

And so as I was Googling photos of horses with moustaches, I somehow ended up at this post.
I don't know what advice I can offer other than this - I have looked for Dot. I can't find her, the information I have all goes to dead ends. If I had the chance I would buy her in a heartbeat. I wonder sometimes, if I found her, what it would be like when I finally saw her. If she would remember me and all the silly names I'd call her... I don't know, its obviously a very hard choice. In my own way though I do envy you. I wish I could be in the position to take someone so special into my life.

I just really felt compelled to comment, too, because my name is Sophie and I felt this reunion tale spoke to me in a fate kind of way.