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In Loving Memory...
~ Gogo Fatale ~


6/2/01 - 10/11/11
~ Forever the Marest of Them All ~
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Sunday, September 18, 2011

The Master Plan

Because my head won't stop spinning over the what-ifs of Gogo's situation, I decided last night that I needed to sit my butt down and write out a concrete set of guidelines for 'proceed or do not proceed' procedures. So, you know, proceed with the procedure-reading!


Green Light Means Go:
If she improves and continues to have improvements.
If she continues to get around well in her field and be able to do all the horsey things she deserves to be able to do: having a herd of friends, living out, stuffing her face, etc.


Yep... that is basically it. So long as she is ok and living what I perceive to be a comfortable and happy life, then we'll keep going.
The do-not-proceed list is longer and more detailed:


Red Light Means No:
If her condition worsens dramatically.
If her condition worsens and does not improve over a week (or longer, depending on severity - but not longer than a month).
If she stops getting around easily in the field.
If she loses interest in basic everyday things she enjoys - food, attention, etc.
If another new injury occurs.
If she is unable to be out doing the things she deserves to be able to do: having a herd of friends, living out, stuffing her face, etc.


Simple, I think. I feel better having it written down. I guess the basic gameplan is this: Try, but don't expect. The reality of it all is that the chances are VERY high that nothing is going to work. But she's still here and she's still pasture sound and able to beat her companions to a pulp, so I might as well stop sitting around in despair and do what I can to try.



A Few Things to Try:
Icing/cold hosing.... maybe pick up a cheap human-version of Game Ready on Ebay if I can find one
Some very basic homeopathy
Herbs/supplements... possibly
Castor oil packs w/Back on Track wraps
AquaTread/E-Stim/PEMF... possibly... it gets expensive fast and I'm not going to waste money on this!
Jenny Craig for Fatties.... drylotting and strict dieting
Acupuncture/chiropractic

Most of this now is all throwing poo at the wall to see what sticks. I'm certainly not going to do ALL of those things, and as for the more expensive things... they are only getting done if I come into a random chunk of money that I don't have anything better to spend it on. A lot of these things might just be dumb ol' hoodoo and nonsense, but nothing else has worked so far, so why not change it up a bit?




It's all just grasping at straws a bit, and I'm not going to keep trying unless she is comfortable and getting around well. If she stops being comfortable and mobile, we're done. But while she's doing decently, I want to at least give it a try. The only thing I have left to lose is her.




Everything has been on fire for 4 months...



... but on Friday the skies changed and we ACTUALLY HAD RAIN!





AND we had an adventure in the rain, all thanks to JenJ.... more on that later ;)

15 comments:

Melissa said...

Good list. If I were in your shoes, I'd make getting her back down to a reasonable weight a priority. That one's certain to make things worse if it's not addressed.

(And I agree, some of the therapies you mentioned are not what I'd consider scientifically sound - but at this point, why not? If it helps, maybe it's just coincidence or a placebo effect - but if it helps, I don't really care!)

Alighieri said...

I'm glad you've got a game plan. Just thinking out specifics makes it easier for me sometimes.

I wouldn't bother with the Game Ready. I own one, and while I love it for maintenance icing (like after weekly gallops), for true injuries I think traditional icing is much better. Even at events, particularly when the ground is hard, I'm much more likely to go find some Jack's ice boots to soak my horse's legs in. Of course part of that is because he has sensitive feet, so I like to get his feet soaked, but I still think the legs get colder and tighter with just ice water.

Kristen Eleni Shellenbarger said...

You can only try and time will tell. Just like your pictures; things were up in FLAMES and now rain. Hmmmmm
I'll still think only the best thoughts of support for you guys!!!

I agree with Melissa; get Pretty's weight down asap is sure to help the strain. :)

Val said...

People are just driving around while the landscape burns? Texas is crazy.

I am glad that you have a plan to give your brain a rest. Works for me, too.

Andrea said...

Val, Future Hubs snapped that picture while driving in the ambulance on an overpass... he thinks it had just started cause he also saw some superstitious looking bums running away from the scene! Don't worry, the local firemen are super versed in this sort of thing and they had it taken care of pretty quickly I am sure ;)

Andrea said...

Errrr suspicious... DYAC!

Margaret said...

Get the weight down - but how do you do that if she is in the pasture a lot? Have you tried one of those horse muzzles? A pony nearby wheres one everyday and my sister used one on her pony and it really worked.

DressageIsToDance said...

You definitely don't want to have her stalled, because she needs to keep moving, but you'll never get her weight down with her out on 24/7 turnout in a grass pasture - of course, that's obvious and I know you realize it.

I think you said your barn has no dry lots at all, and I completely understand having to work with the boarding situation you're in/can afford, but I would like to suggest again seeing if they would work with you on letting her out in an arena at night maybe, so she won't be in anyone's way, and promising to take responsibility for cleaning up after her?

Cygnata said...

She tried the grazing muzzle. Gogo's brain shut down. She didn't try to eat, or even move.

Andrea said...

I promise my pasture has zero grass! She isn't on pasture, she's in a giant rocky 10 acre drylot. In a rainy climate, this field might have growth, but literally it hasn't rained in Texas for almost 5 months.... there is nothing in there but dirt and rocks, and some prickly shrubs and trees. The real problem is the feeding schedule and problems with graining horses but I will not discuss that here. There are plans to move her to a smaller turnout where she will be alone and therefore get a more customized feeding schedule.

sarahskerik said...

Your game plan is a good one. I had to construct a similar plan when I retired my guy. He's at a lovely retirement facility, and gets regular vet and farrier care. But I've already decided that I won't pursue significant treatment beyond excellent basics. If he can't stay sound and healthy enough to eat grass and hang with his buddies, he'll have to cross the bridge. So far, he's holding up his end of the deal, and I will tell you, there is something very gratifying about giving a much loved steed a good retirement after working hard his whole life. He certainly enjoys his life as a lawnmower, and I love seeing him so content. Here's hoping "plan A" will work for you two.

sarahskerik said...

Your game plan is a good one. I had to construct a similar plan when I retired my guy. He's at a lovely retirement facility, and gets regular vet and farrier care. But I've already decided that I won't pursue significant treatment beyond excellent basics. If he can't stay sound and healthy enough to eat grass and hang with his buddies, he'll have to cross the bridge. So far, he's holding up his end of the deal, and I will tell you, there is something very gratifying about giving a much loved steed a good retirement after working hard his whole life. He certainly enjoys his life as a lawnmower, and I love seeing him so content. Here's hoping "plan A" will work for you two.

Denali's Mom said...

I made a list. I have it somewhere, but I told my vet my "I give up" point.

Tell Gogo she's not alone. I need to be put out on a dry lot for a few months too. Maybe we can get a two for one deal on Jennie Craig?

Love ya!

RiderWriter said...

I think you have got it exactly right. I'm so very, very sorry you are going through this torture. Having a sick family member, whether human or animal, is incredibly draining emotionally and physically (and a wallop in the wallet, too). Please take care of yourself as well.

achieve1dream said...

I like this plan. I like the try while she's pasture sound idea. If she ever gives up or is too miserable to stand it you'll do what's right. For now focus on enjoying your time with her and trying some of the inexpensive stuff. Sometimes natural remedies can work miracles. Have you tried DMSO? I've read some great things about it. Just thought I would toss that out there since it's not horribly expensive.